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Houzz Reveal Best of the Week: 40 Marble Marvels From Around the Globe

From floor-to-ceiling marble bathrooms to splashbacks with sensational veins, here’s a gallery of marble marvels.

Are you thinking of including a marble feature in your home? If so, be prepared to be inspired. From the popular marbles such as Cararra, Calacatta and Statuario, to Nero Marquina and other exotic-to-Australia types, and from great slabs of marble to tiles (and marble-look alternatives), here is a quarry’s worth of images that show myriad ways this wonderful natural product has been used across the globe.

 

1. Location: Perth, WA
Why we love it: The veining in the marble is sensational, and adds an element of luxury to the more rustic/ low-maintenance aspects of the kitchen.

2. Location: Singapore
Why we love it: Marble-look surfaces feature throughout this property, giving this apartment a funky retro air – not a look commonly associated with white marble. It’s one for the books.

3. Location: Sydney, NSW
Why we love it: Marble is so well employed in this splashback, especially as it acts as a contrast to the black joinery surrounding it. Again, it is an easy way to add a layer of sophistication to almost any scheme.

4. Location: Austin, USA
Why we love it: Marble, marble, everywhere… This would just be a stunning bathroom to walk into, let alone to use. The way the timber pops out from the patterning is something to be admired. A brilliantly executed interior.

5. Location: San Francisco, USA
Why we love it: Using marble with restraint also works well. This marble-tiled floor, paired with high ceilings, gives this room gravitas.

6. Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Why we love it: The repetition of white marble-clad volumes emphasises the luxury of this relatively small kitchen area. A great example of using this material to raise the stature of a space.

7. Location: Sydney, NSW
Why we love it: Just stand back and take it in. We love the invitation to admire this stunning space, and the way the marble panels used solely on the outside of the island bench, tone down the ‘look at me’ aspect just enough.

8. Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Why we love it: We can’t say it enough… the veins maketh the marble, especially so in this Statuario marble benchtop and splashback.

9. Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Why we love it: Because sometimes a light touch is enough too.

10. Location: London, UK
Why we love it: Marble isn’t all light and beauty. Sometimes it adds a darkly dramatic element just where it’s needed.

11. Location: Los Angeles, USA
Why we love it: Case in point.

12. Location: New York, USA
Why we love it: Because this is a great example of how black marble can elevate a room from ordinary to extraordinary.

13. Location: London, UK
Why we love it: The Statuario marble island bench is the hero of the renovation of this Grade II (heritage) listed Regency house, the ‘furniture’ element anchoring the kitchen and providing a proportional contrast to the tall Georgian windows.

14. Location: London, UK
Why we love it: Imagine this bathroom with plain white walls. The inclusion of marble lifts it into another realm.

15. Location: Spain
Why we love it: Marble can break out of the ‘simple and sophisticated’ cliche. Here it’s paired with lively patterned tiles to beautiful effect.

16. Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Why we love it: The interesting but not overwhelming marble tiles are the ultimate backdrop for the organic-shaped bath. Shape and material working harmoniously.

17. Location: London, UK
Why we love it: We love how marble isn’t the standout material here, but provides the link between the dark upper cabinetry and textured cladding on the base cabinets. A lovely and interesting combination.

18. Location: Italy
Why we love it: The black Marquina marble is an incredibly striking feature in this kitchen, adding a dynamic element to a very restrained scheme.

19. Location: Leicestershire, UK
Why we love it: Understated marble teamed with dark blue-grey cabinetry. Gold.

20. Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Why we love it: These tiles lift the energy of this Swedish powder room no end.

See the next top 20 here!

Stone island
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Improve Your Home With A Stone Island

Out with the dining table and in with a Stone Island!

A stone island in the kitchen can allow room for a lot of improvement in the household.  It can buy you space, save money and increase home value. An island can transform from a family’s communal hub of the hustle and bustle, to being the centre of a night entertaining friends – the versatility one can offer is endless. Designers and architects these days are calling the kitchen ‘the heart of the home’ and here’s how we think your kitchen can benefit from an island.


Stone Islands are…

A multipurpose space. Families are stepping back from the lounge and into the kitchen and an island is a great gathering point! It’s a great place to relax, catch up on each other’s day or have the children do their schoolwork. A big preparation space may help involve the kids with the cooking! For those who like to entertain, an island offers a nice open area for everyone to interact. With an island, you also have the option to chuck some extra bar stools around for additional seating! With so many options, an island acts as a focal point of a room, opening up the whole living space.

Fun to accessorise! Starting with your stone, opt for a classic white Marble stone and compliment it with colourful appliances. Or get a statement piece, like a Quartzite or Granite and make it a kitchen feature! Easily change the mood of your kitchen by swapping out bowls of fruit, for flowers or niche jars. Go big and consider an oversized light fixture, which is becoming a popular design trend. Use the space above the island to hang a row for pots and pants.

Stone Islands help…

Add storage and reduce clutter. What more could you want out of a kitchen! Whether you want a sleek, minimalist look or you simply don’t have enough room to put appliances or rubbish bins, you can tuck them all away in drawers and cabinets underneath. Think specifics like cutlery, a wine rack or a space for your bulky pots and pans. In a recent Houzz study, it was noted that 39% of homeowners are adding islands for additional storage, alone.

There’s a stone option for everyone. Whether your lifestyle is more suited to a natural stone surface or reconstituted stone, kitchen stone islands can be made out of Marble, Granite, Quartzite, Super White or Trendstone Quartz. If you want a super big island, Trendstone XL slabs are a great option. At 3.4m x 1.9m you can have a seamless surface.

These are just a few of many ways that a stone island can increase your kitchen’s functionality.

Adding an island truly allows you to take great advantage of the space in your home. Even if you have a small kitchen to work with, added storage and surface area outweigh the concern. Keep in mind, you can always go for a portable kitchen island on wheels, too!


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Blue Roma Quartzite Benchtop

Quartzite Benchtops – On Trend For 2018

Move over Marble and Granite, Quartzite Benchtops are the choice for kitchens in Melbourne in 2018!

Renovating your kitchen for the new year? Wanting to invest some value into your family home but wanting something different yet resilient? These Brazilian beauties offer the Marble-look with the durability of Granite. Here’s why Quartzite Benchtops are on trend.


The kitchen has become the ultimate communal space in the family home that brings everyone together.  No longer is everything sitting in front of the television in the lounge, they are all hovering over the kitchen benchtop or kitchen island. This is great but what natural stone option can handle the busy family life? The wine spills? The lemon juice? A Quartzite benchtop can.

Quartzite stone is becoming a knowingly more practical alternative to Marble.  For designers and architects, it is aesthetically pleasing. For builders, its durability is a no-brainer. And for homeowners, its low maintenance wins above all.

The formation of Quartzite contributes to all of its winning factors. At the beginning, sandstone transforms into Quartzite by extreme heat and pressure –  becoming much harder and less porous, ultimately helping it withstand heat incredibly well. Go ahead and enjoy a mug of coffee on that stone bench!

Unlike Marble, Quartzite is extremely hard and resilient and won’t etch from household acids like lemon juice or vinegar. This is because Quartzite doesn’t contain calcite, a carbonate mineral, that is susceptible to etching by acidic products.

Quartzite stone requires far less short and long-term maintenance. We recommend to keep it sealed, but its original seal will go much further than on any other natural stone.

And if it wasn’t obvious by now, thanks to the elements of Quartzite, its suitable for indoor AND outdoor application!

Why are Quartzite benchtops so popular in the design industry?

Where it is likened to Marble, is its looks. Quartzite has some unique colours and marble-like veining. Whether you want a real statement piece in a neutral-toned kitchen or a classic marble-look, Quartzite has both options. Designers and homeowners are now wanting to compliment White Kitchen Cabinetry with Statement Benchtops. The design options are endless!

Outside of the home, Quartzite stone is also incredibly on-trend, spot them in office fit outs and bar benchtops. A real popular look is back-lit Quartzite, complimented with a vodka, soda and lime on top of it – no worry if it spills!

If Quartzite hasn’t won over your heart yet, give us a call or come see our selection at Victoria Stone Gallery. We are proud to have a direct source from Brazil to Melbourne, Victoria.


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How to keep clean marble
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Clean Marble – 5 Easy DIY Tips

Dying for a marble benchtop but the thought of maintaining clean marble is daunting? Architectural Design share these Clever, household tips on how to keep that marble surface as beautiful as the day it was installed!


How to Clean Marble (Yes, There’s Hope for Those Stains!)

Caring for this beautiful material is as easy pie

The marble kitchen counter of your dreams (and Pinterest boards) is finally installed—but wait, there’s a catch: how to clean marble? Keeping marble countertops and tile clean is actually simpler than you’d think. But, as with maintaining any surface and most things in life, you need to know what you’re dealing with. Now there’s day-to-day marble cleaning and then there’s the kind of tactics you’ll need to employ if Uncle Pat puts the punch bowl on his head at dinner and spills Cabernet across the length of your beautiful, white marble island. You got this—here’s how to clean marble and make it stay that way.

Supplies You’ll Want to Keep on Hand

  • sealant of your choice (food-safe, if for use on a marble counter)
  • soap and water (for counters)
  • dust mop (for floors)
  • hydrogen peroxide
  • ammonia
  • liquid cleaner
  • #0000 steel wool

Hand cleaning black marble stone counter bar

How to Maintain and Clean Marble Surfaces

Know your marble. Think like the marble. Be the marble. Marble is more porous than other common countertop materials like engineered stone (sold often as simply “quartz”) or soapstone, so it can be prone to staining and etching (a.k.a light scratching or physical changes to the stone itself). You’ll want to clean and seal yours regularly. More on that below—and easy enough to do before you’ve had coffee, promise.

Prevention is key. Whatever marble you have in your home, sealing it every few months is a good idea. According to the Marble Institute, sealants don’t make the stone stain-proof but they do make it more stain resistant—giving you a bit more time to get to big spills. Check with whoever supplied your marble for their recommendations on the right products to use (and remember to make sure it’s food safe if you’re using it in the kitchen). For marble floors, coffee tables, and other high-traffic surfaces invest in some furniture pads and some coasters—better safe than sorry.

Daily cleaning. For routine maintenance and spills you catch quickly, warm, soapy water is the best for the job. Just make sure to rinse well, sop up any standing water, and thoroughly dry the surface. Also note that for marble, acid is kryptonite—so do your best to keep things like wine and lemon juice (or even cleaners that contain vinegar) away from the surface. And if they do spill, tend to them as quickly as possible. For marble floors, start with a dust mop; you want to avoid anything abrasive on the surface, and dirt and sand being dragged around by a vacuum could do more damage than you intend.

Getting out pesky stains. If you don’t catch a spill quickly (hello, red wine spilled at a lasts-until-2am dinner party), there’s hope. For most organic food stains, the Marble Institute recommends cleaning with a solution of 12% hydrogen peroxide and a few drops of ammonia; if you spilled anything oil-based, like a vinaigrette, and the stain has set, attack it (gently) with a liquid cleanser that contains “household detergent, mineral spirits, or acetone.”

Correcting etching. For water spots, light scratches, and nicks, try buffing your marble with dry #0000 steel wool. Anything deeper than surface level scratches will require a professional’s help. So if you left a lemon out on the counter and now it’s both etched and left a stain, go ahead and use the above recommendations for food stains to take care of the latter. Sadly, the etching will likely need to be polished by a professional—so be careful where you leave your cut lemons!


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Granite Benchtops Slabs Row

Granite Benchtops – Hard To Beat!

You must be living under a rock if you haven’t heard already the advantages of Granite benchtops. Strong, durable, and little maintenance required. Have it in your Melbourne home or bathroom for life!

We have over 15 styles and counting for your Granite benchtop dreams at Victoria Stone Gallery. Read on and shop our Granite product catalogue.


What type of natural stone is Granite?

Granite is one of the world’s toughest stones! An igneous rock formed over millions of years from extreme heat and rapidly cooling volcanic magma.

Granite is second strongest to diamonds and some Quartzites.

Granite Slabs Row

Uses for Granite?

Diverse and durable, Granite can be used decorative or functional! Granite benchtops and granite bathrooms are hugely popular in family homes. Granite is a popular stone choice for outdoor areas in Australian homes for BBQ areas and outdoor table tops.

Outside of the household, you’ll find Granite used for anything from tiles, paving stones, building construction, bridges to tombstones.

Why should you choose Granite?

It is dense, durable and very resistant to chemicals and acids! It offers the beauty of natural stone with less maintenance and will add value to your home. Granite comes in a limitless range of colours, and loved for its speckled appearance given off from small shiny flecks.

There are some great retro looking granite slabs here at Victoria Stone, with Uba Tuba Granite making a real comeback!

Uba Tuba Granite Benchtops

A typical Uba Tuba Granite benchtop look. Photo credit: bestdesignideas.com

How do you maintain Granite?

It’s true, most Granite applications require little to no maintenance. But, to see your Granite benchtops live out a lifetime and prevent liquids from absorbing in, have it professionally sealed at least once after installation. Granite benchtops will buy you a little more clean up time in between spills than marble benchtops but do wipe them up as quickly as possible.

Our friends at the Granite Benchtop Company recommends this fail-safe method for caring for your granite benchtop.

How to clean granite benchtops

Granite Benchtops require little to no maintenance, a dream clean!

Special considerations when shopping for Granite?

Granite benchtops are more uniformed compared to heavily veined natural stones. If you’re a homeowner or architect in Melbourne that prefers the solid, consistent look, then this could be the stone choice for you.

We know now that Granite benchtops will withstand household battles more than others, but did you know that granite is stronger than a knife? Always use a chopping board to keep your knives in good condition.


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Photo Credit Colonial Marble and Granite Quartz V Natural Stone
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Quartz V Natural Stone

Shopping for a new stone benchtop for your kitchen? There are a lot of stone options in the Australian market these days, which is great! But it all drives down to two options. Man-made (aka reconstituted or reengineered stone) Quartz V Natural Stone.

Are you looking for indoor or outdoor application? Do you need a stone benchtop to withstand a hectic lifestyle? Are you wondering which will add more value to your home? Have a read of this super informative article from Phillymag.com & Colonial Marble & Granite for a quick crash course in the differences and similarities between Quartz V Natural Stone.


Quartz vs. Natural Stone: Similarities, Differences and When to Use Each

When you’re opting to swap out your old bar or kitchen countertops for something new, there’s a lot to consider. First, you need to think about value and quality — are you willing to pay a little extra for quartz or natural stone, which has more staying power than laminates and can also help raise your property value? Aside from being a good investment for your home, natural stone or quartz are durable enough to withstand the wear-and-tear of extreme cooking and regular family gatherings. So, if you’re ready to make a valuable upgrade to your living space, here’s what you need to know about quartz and natural stone countertops, and what you should expect out of your install.

First, a briefing on both:

  • Quartz, in its natural state, is found in large crystals or small, sand-like grains. Once mined, the stone is mixed with man-made materials, like resin, which allows for a cleaner cut and more scratch and stain resistance. Quartz is one of the most popular materials for counters and backsplashes, due to its durability and antimicrobial, non-absorbent properties. Colonial Marble offers one of the widest varieties of quartz in the country, from the extremely durable Q Quartz to ECO, which is made mostly of recycled materials and comes in a variety of hues and textured patterns.
  • Natural stone is a bit less malleable than quartz but withholds a snowflake-like individuality that makes it truly, naturally unique. Sourced straight from the earth, natural stones like a soft-coloured limestone or bold marble show off raw patterns, flecks and textures that quartz can only mimic through manmade mixing. When it comes to choosing a timeless, on-trend look, Arctic Cream graniteBianco Venatino marble and Lagos Blue limestone are three (literally) solid options.
Photo Credit Colonial Marble and Granite Quartz V Natural Stone

Photo Credit Colonial Marble and Granite

The differences between Quartz V Natural Stone:

  • Quartz is fused with resin and other polymers, and does not need to be sealed regularly. Natural stone, however, may require yearly sealings to maintain its smooth look and durability. Additionally, this material makeup is less prone to chipping than natural stone.
  • Since quartz is mechanically engineered with naturally mined materials and binding resins, cleaner cuts are available. It’s because of this that quartz is considered extremely design-friendly.
  • When opting for natural stone, it’s a good idea to go with an “eased edge,”. It gives the stone a thick cut look that helps to play up the natural texture and marbling.

The similarities between Quartz V Natural Stone:

  • Quartz and natural stone are both extremely heavy. Due to this, it is important to work with a professional during installation. The team at Colonial Marble will not only help with installation but can provide samples, quotes and even a Kitchen Visualizer to help you decide just where to make your upgrades.
  • Natural stone and quartz do not always hold up to extreme weather conditions, making indoor installation the preferred method. Planning on installing an outdoor bar or fireplace? Make sure your granite or marble surface is safe from hard rain and the scorching sun.
  • Historically, the price of quartz and natural stone, like marble, seemed out of reach for many. But, as granite, marble, quartz and stone countertops become increasingly trendy in today’s homes, materials are becoming more and more affordable.
Photo Credit Colonial Marble and Granite2

Photo Credit Colonial Marble and Granite


Contemporary house in Germany built out of grey Quatrzite matte stone

Curious Over A Quartzite Benchtop

What is Quartzite? How is it different to Marble? Read on into the world of this natural stone and why we recommend a Quartzite benchtop for your kitchen in Melbourne.

Keep an eye out for some coloured  Quartzite benchtop beauties that we will be bringing in from Brazil in the new year!


What type of natural stone is Quartzite?

Quartzite is often confused with Quartz, a man-made produced stone, engineered from resin and quartz chips tinted with various colours.

It is a metamorphic rock that is the result of sandstone and the mineral quartz being put under extreme heat and pressure within the crust of the earth. Its changes are a slow process resulting in an altered appearance of rich colours and patterns that are formed as a result of different conditions.

Colours range from white to black, with shades of blue, green, yellow and brown. A slab can appear grainy because of its formation from sandstone through recrystallization of Quartz grains. At least 90% of a Quartzite stone slab is Quartz.

Quartzite kitchen benchtop

Uses for Quartzite?

For a long time, it was commonly used for bricks and other building materials. It became very versatile in construction, used for strong materials to flooring to decorative wall coverings and recently has become very popular for kitchen benchtops.

This contemporary house in Cologne, Germany was built in 2016 out of grey Quartzite stone. The stone is so diverse, it flows systematically through the interior, cladding bathrooms, the whole of the swimming pool area and many of the home´s floors. Read the full article here.

Contemporary house in Germany built out of grey Quatrzite matte stone

Contemporary house in Germany built out of grey Quartrzite matte stone

Quartzite is awesome for an outdoor stone application. It has very low water absorption rates. It is very resilient to staining from leaf and debris. And it has a high resistance to slipping thanks to its textured surface.

Why should you choose Quartzite?

Interior designers love a quartzite benchtop for the look, builders and homeowners love it for its durability!

It comes in lots of popular varieties, like White Macaubas, Mother of Pearl, Taj Mahal and La Dolce Vita. Here at Victoria Stone Gallery, we will be specialising in a big range of exotic coloured Quartzite, bringing it in from Brazil to Melbourne.

It’s heat resistant and naturally strong. On the Mohs scale of hardness of 1 to 10 (10 being the hardest), Quartzite measures in at 7, with Granite behind in between 6 and 6.5. This difference will buy you a bit more time to clean up before the stone starts to etch if it comes into contact with acidic materials.

How do you maintain a Quartzite benchtop?

Although it is heat resistant, any prolonged heat exposure can cause problems.  Just avoid that by using trivets, hot pots, chopping boards! Avoid etching by keeping common household items that are notorious for etching away, like lemons, fizzy drink, and red wine. Etching is basically the surface damage in the form of a dull mark on natural stone.  It happens when acidic substances come into contact with natural stone that contains calcium carbonate.

Sealing will depend on the type of Quartzite you have, ranging from not having to be sealed at all, to resealing every year or so, to regular sealing. Check with your stone fabricator which category yours falls under! Adding a stone sealant will give an extra layer of protection.
Just like with any other natural stone surface, clean up spills quickly, using a damp, soft cloth and a mild spray disinfectant if needed.

Consider picking a honed or leathered finish over a polished finish – they are more forgiving on etching and stains! Honed benchtops aren’t as reflective as polished and are smoother and flatter, which helps to prevent etching. A honed finish on harder stones is much more durable for benchtops in your kitchen.

Generally there is a lot less maintenance in comparison to other natural stone, yet still with the look of marble!

Leathered Blue Roma Quartzite from Victoria Stone Gallery

Our Blue Roma Quartzite looks striking in a leathered finish.

Special considerations when shopping for Quartzite?

Quartzite comes in soft or hard variations, sometimes the fabrication can be more expensive when it’s harder to cut through. Always check with your preferred fabricator if they have worked with it before! A Quartzite benchtop offers a lifetime of unique look alongside practicality, give it the professional installation and fabrication it deserves!

 


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More About Marble

More about Marble

Thinking about buying Marble for your benchtop in Melbourne, Victoria? Here are some fast facts to get your shop on! Find out some more about Marble.


More about Marble

What type of natural stone is Marble?

Marble is a metamorphic rock. It forms when limestone is subjected to the heat and pressure of metamorphism. This video of marble quarrying in the Italian Alps shows some neat footage of how marble can be quarried.

Carrara Italy – marble quarry in Fantiscritti valley. Marble works of Miseglia. Apuan Alps mountains.

Uses for Marble?

White Marble has been used for centuries in classic sculptures to construction. You might recognise it in such works of art like Michaelangelo’s, David, or the Taj Mahal, even recently in modern-day photo shoots like the one campaigned by NZ brand Lonely Lingerie where woman modelled next to Carrara Marble. Marble is commonly used in Melbourne in the bathroom, kitchen benchtops – Where the Kitchen starts, splashbacks or reception counters. Don’t let the characteristics of Marble scare you away from using it in your home! Read our post on Marble & 5 Facts Nobody Will Tell You.

Why should you choose Marble?

It’s beautiful and timeless. Homeowners and Melbourne stone fabricators sometimes shy away from marble being one of the softer natural stones and more prone to etching and stains. The right care will maintain it and you’ll have a stunning marble benchtop, adding value to your home. Read this amazing story on Natural Stone at home? How much is it worth – who knows how much value your marble benchtop or marble bathroom may bring you!

How do you maintain Marble?

Be sure to seal your marble benchtop every one to two years. Protect your marble benchtop from vinegar and citrus’. Avoid using acidic or abrasive cleaners on your marble benchtop.

 


Check out our Marble catalogue.

Christmas and New Year Hours at VSG

Christmas and New Year Hours

It’s been a great first year here at Victoria Stone Gallery.

We’ve met a lot of new people and sold some beautiful stone slab. Now we’re excited to bring you some new marbles, quartzites and granites in the New Year! We will be available by appointment between December 18th-22nd, and wrapping up on December 22nd and reopening on January 15th, 2018. Have a great Christmas and New Year!

OUR STORY

Victoria Stone Gallery opened in March 2017, lead by a father and daughter team. After wholesaling and fabricating in New Zealand for 20 years, our founder, Chris, moved to Brazil to be at the forefront of new and exciting natural marble and quartzite discoveries. Chris spends his days travelling the world sourcing and trading natural marble and other exotic stones, suppling New Zealand, America and Brazil. In 2017 he fulfilled a dream of opening a marble and granite wholesaler in Melbourne, Australia. And So Victoria Stone Gallery was born. We operate from one site in the South East suburbs of Melbourne, where we have our offices, showroom and warehouse. Our small team are all knowledgeable, friendly and love working with stone slabs.

MISSION FOR 2018

Our company mission is to bring a range of unique and speciality natural marble, granite and quartzite slabs to the market. We believe there is a stone out there for everyone. We aim to cover variety in cost, colours, finishes and stone types – while never compromising on quality.

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Parthenon Greek Marble frieze replica the Greek Centre 2

Greek Marble Unveiling in Melbourne’s CBD

The Greek Community of Melbourne’s headquarter building unveiled an impressive replica of the Parthenon Greek Marble frieze on Sunday 26th of November.

The life-size, border of Greek marble runs along the building’s entrance at six metres long. The stone slab not only reflects one of the most recognised symbols of Ancient Greece but reminds us of the HQ’s significance in the Australian-Greek community and the buildings historical connection to Greece.

“The building offers so many different services to Greek Australians. But at the same time we want the building and those services to appropriately reflect through symbols of our culture and heritage,” Mr Papastergiadis told Neos Kosmos.

To mark the momentous occasion, the street closed off to celebrate with speeches, music and performances near the centre. Significant political leaders and personalities of the community attended, including Melbourne-born actress and comedian Mary Coustas. Coustas was one of many speakers, eager to draw the attention to the return of the Parthenon Marble back to Greece. The friezes are on permanent display in the British Museum after being controversially taken from Athens in the 1800s.

Parthenon Greek Marble frieze at British Museum

A segment of the original Parthenon Marble frieze currently at British Museum

“Britain is conveniently ignoring the screams from the world at large (to return the Greek marbles) because it benefits them, too,” she said. “We need to keep the dream alive and keep applying pressure.”

Dubbing herself a proud Greek-Australian, Coustas likened the marbles cause to the recent Yes vote in the gay marriage debate.

Followed by Victoria State premier Daniel Andrews. “We continuously demand the restoration of the injustice done by Lord Elgin two centuries earlier. This is not just my personal opinion. But a standing demand of the Victoria government and all the parties that are part of it. And will not change until this injustice has been restored.”

The Greek Centre is home to the city’s official Greek community organizations. It has become renowned as a hub of Greek cultural life and activity. Some have disputed the placement of the replica and its placement above a burger restaurant. But its beauty cannot be denied. Nor the opportunity to voice support for efforts to return the Parthenon Greek Marbles.

In the new year, Victoria Stone Gallery will be getting in some stunning Greek marble ourselves, keep an eye on our product catalogue to find a relic of your own!

Source pappaspost.comneskosmos.com, thenationalherald.com